Monday, August 15, 2016

7th Circuit Again Holds Title VII Does Not Cover Sexual Orientation Discrimination

The Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, faced yet again with a claim arguing that sexual orientation discrimination is actionable under Title VII, granted summary judgment in favor of the defendant holding that the law and precedent is clear that Title VII does not allow for claims of sexual orientation discrimination.  While the 7th Circuit in their 42-page decision seem reluctant to make this ruling upholding the lower district court, they do take care to provide much commentary on how such claims may be actionable and also suggest that the times may be ripe for Title VII--or another law such as ENDA--to cover such claims, noting how several states, have laws protecting sexual orientation status in employment and how the Supreme Court has struck down almost every ban on gay marriage.  In noting the issue of gay marriage in the Supreme Court, the 7th Circuit noted the paradox in which "...a person can be married on Saturday and then fired on Monday for just that act.”  The 7th Circuit also opined that perhaps it is time for the Supreme Court to weigh in on this issue, which may be a reason they heard this appeal, despite their seemingly easy decision to make.

Luckily for employees in Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act ("WFEA") does provide protection against discrimination in the workplace against individuals based on their sexual orientation.  Sexual orientation under the WFEA is defined as having a preference for heterosexuality, homosexuality or bisexuality, having a history of such a preference or being identified with such a preference.

The case is Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College, No. 15-1720 (7th Cir. July 28, 2016).  


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